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Proposal Categories 2014 SCBG Program

  • Universities, institutions, cooperatives, producers, industry or community-based organizations may submit a proposal in the categories listed below.

  • The majority of proposals will fall in one of the catagories below. If you have a suggestion for a proposal that does not fit in these catagories, you can email proposal suggestion to TN.SCBG@tn.gov for reveiw.

  • The deadline to submit final proposals is May 8, 2014.

Good Ag Practices/Food Safety/ Traceability — $50,000 Maximum Request

This category could include but is not limited to training, education and specialized needs to incorporate GAPs, GMPs and/or specialty crop traceability.


Wholesale Produce Markets — $50,000 Maximum Request

This category could include but is not limited to on-farm needs that enhance marketing, production, packing and/or distribution of specialty crops. This includes:

  • Efficiency of distribution systems by enhancing the shelf life and marketability of crops/farm products through shared post-harvest handling and storage, logistics, warehousing, cold storage, or transportation.
  • Prevention and management of pests and diseases to protect markets and minimize economic harm to specialty crop growers, including integrated pest management.
  • On-farm labor needs connecting growers with hiring resources, providing technical information about laws and compliance, or developing mechanization or methodologies for routine or repetitive labor demands. Create and implement workforce training programs to maintain the technical skills required to keep the Oregon specialty crops sector competitive.
  • Productivity enhancements and innovation in production practices, mechanization, irrigation, natural resource management, energy conservation/efficiency or renewable energy development, ecosystems services or other arenas.

Innovative Specialty Crop Projects — $50,000 Maximum Request

This category could include but is not limited to on-farm needs that enhance marketing, production, packing and/or distribution of specialty crops.

The goal is to build Tennessee farm income with tangible projects that have a lasting impact. Projects must impact multiple Tennessee Specialty crop producers. This impact can be measured through increased revenue, decreased costs, or effective dissemination of information, technologies and opportunities pertaining to specialty crops. This includes:

  • International
    • Understanding and addressing trade barriers or regulatory constraints in foreign markets (e.g. tariffs, TRQs, FTAs, quotas, bilateral agreements).
    • Obtaining market information and providing product exposure through trade shows, conferences, seminars, market research, consumer testing, in-bound and outbound trade missions, etc.
    • Applying new technologies to help identify new customers and facilitate shipments (e.g. packaging configurations, customer data, logistics, transportation enhancements, etc.).
  • Local/farm-direct, regional and domestic markets
    • Obtaining market information and providing product exposure through trade shows, conferences, seminars, market research, consumer testing, in-bound and outbound trade missions, etc.
    • Connect farmers to consumers by enhancing direct marketing opportunities that highlight production practices, farmers, and growing locations.
    • Support the development and advancement of co-operatives to leverage grower and producer efforts.
    • Develop and enhance economic opportunities in local communities, such as agri-tourism that increase the awareness and consumption of specialty crops.
    • Increasing child and adult nutrition knowledge and consumption of specialty crops by expanding access at schools, at work and in local neighborhoods?
  • Training and equipping the next generation of farmers in agronomic, economic and environmental stewardship skills. Introduce, educate and recruit people to the variety of specialty crop career opportunities.