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Types of Parole Hearings

Pursuant to statute, parole hearings are conducted in local jails, Department of Correction institutions and other locations within the state for all eligible offenders who come under the purview of the Board. Parole Hearings Officers conduct hearings in the following categories:

Grant hearing: A hearing held to consider an eligible offender for release from incarceration to parole supervision.

Preliminary parole revocation hearing: Also known as a probable cause hearing. Such hearings are conducted by a Parole Hearings Officer to determine if the offender likely violated a condition of his/her parole.

Final revocation hearing: A hearing held to determine whether an offender has violated the conditions of his parole. Following a revocation hearing, parole supervision may either be revoked or reinstated.

Custodial hearing: A hearing in which parole from one sentence to another is considered.

Pre-parole rescission hearing: A hearing procedure by which the Board may terminate an inmate's grant of parole before the inmate is actually released on parole, due to conduct, violations or omissions committed by such inmate prior to his or her release, or pertinent information that was not available at the time of the hearing.

Post-parole rescission hearing: A hearing to by which the Board may terminate an offender's grant of parole after such offender is actually released on parole, due to contact, violations or omissions committed by such offender, significant information fraudulently given or withheld by the offender or on behalf of the offender, or other information the Board was unaware of at the time of the parole grant.

Time setting hearing: A hearing held to determine when to begin service of a new felony conviction committed while the offender was on parole supervision.

Appeal hearing: Upon written request from the offender or an attorney representing the offender, the Board may grant an appellate review to an offender whose parole has been denied, revoked or rescinded, if there is significant new evidence or information not available at the time or the hearing, if there was misconduct by the Hearings Official substantiated by the record, or if the Hearings Official made significant procedural errors.